John Krauss
Obsessive tester. Avid dreamer.
I'm passionate about good quality sleep. I tried fourteen pillows over the course of six months. I am reader-supported, and I may earn money from qualifying purchases.

In-depth Comparison (2022): Casper Original Pillow vs. Purple Harmony Pillow

I tested 14 different pillows over the course of six months. I slept on each pillow for at least five nights each. I rated each pillow based on how comfortable it was to sleep on over an extended period of time, whether or not the construction seemed high quality to me, and my take on suitability for different body types and sleep positions. Here is an in-depth comparison of the Casper Original Pillow and Purple Harmony Pillow.

At a Glance

Brand Name Casper Purple
Pillow Name Original Pillow Harmony Pillow
Overall Rank #4 out of 14 #6 out of 14
Fill Type Polyester Fiber (Down Alternative) Solid Latex Foam
Firmness / Softness Extra Soft Soft
Starting Loft 10 inches 6.5 inches
Sleep Positions Stomach, Back Back
Body Types Average, Big-and-tall Petite, Average, Big-and-tall
Filling Comfort
Construction Quality
Score Out of 10 8.8 7.8

Detailed Reviews

#4. Casper Original Pillow

Polyester Fiber (Down Alternative)

#4 out of 14
Extra soft but also extra thick. For back-sleepers who want a supportive, soft pillow
  • High-quality construction
  • Extra soft
  • Sinks in when laying down
  • Great for back-sleepers
  • Not fully adjustable
  • May be hard to fit into pillow case
  • Premium price
  • For side-sleepers, unlikely to get desired loft
Firmness / Softness: Extra Soft
Starting Loft: 10 inches
Sleep Positions: Stomach, Back
Body Types: Average, Big-and-tall
Filling Comfort:
Construction Quality:

The Casper Original Pillow uses a pillow-in-pillow design with two layers, both made of polyester fiber, at slightly different firmness levels. This creates a thick but soft pillow that is great for back-sleepers who want a polyester fiber pillow. However, I don't recommend this pillow for side-sleepers due to the lack of adjustability: the thickness combined with the softness results in an unpredictable loft.

The Casper pillow is great for back-sleepers, but I wouldn't recommend it for side-sleepers.

The most noticeable aspect of the Casper pillow is the loft: I measure it at 10 inches thick, the highest loft of any pillow tested. This is because the pillow is actually made up of a regular sized pillow covered by another layer of pillow. The outer layer can be unzipped to reveal the inner pillow sandwiched inside. The outer layer is extremely soft and thin. It resembles a comforter or a thick blanket. In fact, the pillow does remind me of a regular pillow wrapped in a comforter. The outer layer sinks completely in when used.

Unzipping the outer pillow reveals an inner pillow also made with polyester filling. Keep in mind that though the pillow can be unzipped, the filling cannot be adjusted. Unzipping doesn't give access to the filling. It only gives access to the inner pillow. While you can technically have three different lofts by sleeping on the inside pillow by itself, the outside layer by itself, and both layers combined, I wouldn't consider the pillow to be adjustable. I suspect most people will be sleeping on the pillow with all the layers together because either layer by itself is too thin for my preferences. Like the outer layer, the inner pillow sinks all the way down when I lay my head on it by itself. Based on my experience, neither the inner pillow nor the outer pillow will provide enough support for side-sleepers or back-sleepers individually. Theoretically, the inner pillow could be used for stomach-sleeping, but there are other options on the market that don't involve discarding half the pillow.

When used together, the pillows start at the full 10-inch-high loft. Laying my head down makes the pillow significantly thinner since both parts of the pillow are so soft. The inner pillow and the outer pillow compress all the way down when slept on individually, but the combined pillow does leave some loft simply because there is so much material. Unfortunately, as a side-sleeper, the loft feels slightly off for me, leaving my head angled uncomfortably. It's possible that some side-sleepers will find the loft level perfect, but I recommend that side-sleepers stick with a fully adjustable pillow like the Saybrook or Coop.

The Casper pillow and Sleepgram pillow share a lot of similarities. From the outside, they even look almost the same except for the different logos. There are three main differences, though. First, the Sleepgram pillow comes with two inner pillows. Despite this, both the Casper and Sleepgram pillows have the same loft, so the Sleepgram inner pillows are individually thinner compared to the Casper inner pillow. Second, the zipper on the Casper pillow feels to me like it's easier to operate compared to the zipper on the Sleepgram pillow, which contributes to my perception that the Casper pillow has higher quality construction. Finally, I find the Sleepgram pillow to be even softer than the Casper pillow. My head sinks down even more with the Sleepgram pillow. This is because the Sleepgram polyester filling glides more easily, so some of the material moves out of the way when I lay my head on it. The Casper pillow polyester fill is also soft, but it stays underneath my head, so even though it compresses, the material stays there to provide some loft.

Unlike some of the other pillows reviewed, the Casper pillow doesn't come with a separate cover. Inserting this pillow into a pillow case can be difficult due to the thickness. Though the pillow compresses easily when sleeping on it, getting it to compress from 365 degrees to shove inside a pillow case is relatively frustrating. It is far from impossible, but it does take more energy than it should. I find that when pillows are difficult to insert into pillow cases, I subconsciously avoid wash cycles.

The lack of adjustability makes the Casper pillow a non-starter for side-sleepers since the angle of the head is so important and everyone has a different shoulder and head size. For back-sleepers looking for a polyester fiber pillow, the Casper pillow is a great choice. Because of the thickness, even though the pillow sinks significantly, it still provides some support.

#6. Purple Harmony Pillow

Solid Latex Foam

#5 out of 14
A bouncy pillow with a unique feel. Great to try once, but I consider it a novelty like a water bed
  • Squishy and fun to squeeze
  • Soft interior
  • Grid prevents sweat build-up
  • Great for back-sleepers
  • Not adjustable
  • Bouncy when I lay my head on it
  • Jiggles when I shift my weight, which I find distracting as I fall asleep
  • Premium price
Firmness / Softness: Soft
Starting Loft: 6.5 inches
Sleep Positions: Back
Body Types: Petite, Average, Big-and-tall
Filling Comfort:
Construction Quality:

The Purple Harmony Pillow has a very unique feel since it is made of latex foam on the inside and a rubber-like grid built into its cover. The material is fun to squeeze because it is bouncy and squishy, but what makes a good stress ball doesn't necessarily make a good pillow. For back sleepers particularly worried about sweating, the Purple Harmony Pillow is worth trying, but I wouldn't recommend the pillow due to the bounciness.

Lying on the Purple Harmony Pillow feels like lying on a bouncy water balloon. My head will squish it down, and I can feel a distinct bounce as well as a jiggle. The pillow also wobbles when I shift my weight, which can sometimes keep me awake.

When I lie down on the pillow, I am distinctly reminded of a water balloon. It is soft enough to squish down and compress, but the elasticity of the latex foam means that my head bounces back. I'll also feel a small trembling vibration make its way through the pillow, not unlike the feeling of water swashing back and forth. Every time I shift my weight on the pillow, the pillow will jiggle. Because I shift my weight occasionally as I fall asleep, the wobbling of the pillow will snap me back awake. I've had several instances where I was close to falling asleep only to be brought back to attention from the wobble. Nevertheless, I do eventually fall asleep, so the pillow doesn't completely prevent me from sleeping.

The Purple Grid resides in the cover of the pillow. The material feels like the grips in a gel-grip pen. The latex foam inside has an elastic bounce.

The signature Purple Grid can be found in the cover of the pillow. The substance of the grid feels like a gel-grip pen. It is fun to squeeze, but when I lay my head on it, I mostly just feel the latex foam underneath. The latex foam is what gives the bounce. The grid serves mainly to provide aeration since solid foam pillows tend to trap heat and sweat against the sleeper. In my experience, I find the grid to be pretty effective in preventing sweat build-up, but if heat and sweat is a concern, down and down alternative pillows tend to be better for breathability than solid foam pillows in general.

Unfortunately, sleeping on the Purple grid has left imprints on my skin in the shape of the grid. These imprints tend to fade within 30 minutes for me, but it can be a risk for early morning meetings. Though everyone's experience will vary, it's notable that this is the only pillow I tested where I noticed a problem like this. Other pillows have patterns on the cover, but other pillows have soft covers while the Purple grid is firm enough to leave marks on my skin.

In my personal experience, sleeping on the Purple grid left marks on my skin.

The Purple Harmony Pillow comes in three different loft levels, but the options are separated by one inch each, according to the Purple website at my time of purchase. Though I appreciate the different options, a one inch difference is the difference between a size 6 and a size 9 shoe (for both men and women), and I'd prefer a fully adjustable pillow that can accommodate sizes in between. Because the Purple Harmony Pillow is not adjustable, I wouldn't recommend it for side-sleepers.

Overall, I consider the Purple Harmony Pillow a novelty experience akin to a water bed. It's fun to try once, but I don't want to sleep on it regularly. I would not consider it worth purchasing again at the price point that I paid.

Picking the right pillow can be important. I did all the research here to make the process easier. I hope that this blog helps you as you make your decision.